click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130201
20130228
STATION
CSPAN2 6
CSPAN 4
MSNBCW 4
CNN 3
CNNW 3
MSNBC 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we are reading about a $3 billion cut in the military health care system. the pentagon could be restructuring contracts. what do you want to say about those areas? guest: training is going to be cut. dod has said only unit preparing to deploy will be training. everybody else in the air force and navy, the planes will be grounded. they will take the money they would have used to do the training and shifted into the war account to pay for afghanistan. try care -- tricare is what you mentioned. people will still get benefits can be seen by doctors. host: a big fight in washington over the defense aspect. what else should we know about the defense area? guest: there will be an impact. there are two sides of sequestration. there is the side that we need to cut federal spending and defense needs to play a role. talking to people in the pentagon, a lot of them would agree with that. the problem is they are halfway through the year. they have not been preparing for this at all. they will have to squeeze all of these cuts into a six-month period. the next six months, it is implemented
will oppose hagel no matter what. >> i believe he's the wrong person to lead the pentagon at this perilous and consequential time. >> tea party senator ted cruz tried to gin up an old conservative bogeyman. >> i'd like to draw your attention to an interview you did in 2009 with al jazeera. >> but here's the real reason. these guys don't want chuck hagel in the defense department. this is the bomb bomb iran crowd. you see, mccain and graham have led the charge for possible war against the iranians as well as syria. chuck hagel sees war as an absolute last resored. it that's why president obama picked him. the two share similar views in philosophy as the obama administration attempts to define the role of the united states in the transition to a post-superpower world. their philosophy is this. the united states must get out of these massive land wars, iraq and afghanistan, and if possible avoid future large-scale war. despite all of the posturing and starcraft, hagel's nomination, well, is not in jeopardy. not one senator who previously voiced support for hagel has changed his or her mind. i
103 different stem -- science, technologies, engineering and math -- programs within the pentagon alone. consolidating those would save $1.7 billion over the next ten years. these are programs that are not necessarily initiated by congress, by the way. so they do have the flexibility to make those changes. department of defense tuition assistance program totally duplicates our veterans tuition assistance program. so you can do in service have this access to tuition while in service and then have the identical tuition access afterwards and you can claim them both. there's nothing wrong with wanting togy an educational benefit to our troops, but we don't need to do it twice. that's a significant savings of $4.5 billion. alternative energy. we have a department of energy. their whole goal is to work on alternative energy and renewable energy and efficiency within energy. the department of defense is spending $700 million a year on research in alternative energy that totally duplicates everything we're doing everywhere else. so there's $00700 million that we should not be spending at
talk shows and defended the man nominated to succeed him at the pentagon. panetta suggested the tough questioning senator hagel faced during third's capitol hill hearing, was driven by politics. >> it is pretty obvious the political knives were out for chuck hagel. what disappointed me is that they talked a lot about past quotes but what about when a secretary of defense is confronting today? we did not see enough time spent on discussing those issues. in the end that is what counted. >> he says hagel should have been questions about issues like afghanistan, the middle east, and the looming budget cuts at the pentagon but he came underfire for past statements of israel, iran, and u.s. nuclear strategy. at least 12 republicans plan to vote against hagel while only two, so far, have said they would vote for him. that is congress ran of mississippi, and a senator from nebraska. observers on both sides thought hagel did not do such a great job at the hearing. >> disconcerting thing, obviously fox anyone that watched it, he seemed unimpressive and unprepared on the questions that he knew w
in atlanta. and we will hear about the suspect's military background from barbara starr at the pentagon. paul, to you first. bring us up to speed on the hunts for this ex-cop, his former colleagues describing him as armed and extremely dangerous. >> reporter: that's right, michael. and in fact in his manifesto, he says i have a barrett 50, meaning a semiautomatic sniper rifle. behind me you can see officers are on high alert. not far from here in riverside, california early this morning, dorner is suspected of fatally killing one officer and critically injuring another one, as they were on patrol here in riverside. and then earlier in the morning, in corona, california, some lapd officers, who were assigned to security detail of an officer, who was mentioned in the manifesto and was off duty, these two officers were driving in corona, getting off a freeway, when they believe that dorner opened fire on them. one of those officers suffered from a grazing wound to the forehead. so in all, three separate shooting incidents involving people here. dorner apparently having an ex--military record. wh
it calls "non- lethal" assistance. and with panetta's departure from the pentagon today, plus clinton's last week and petraeus's resignation in 2012, general dempsey is the only known remaining advocate of arming the rebels still in a top advisory role. i'm joined who served in the obama administration state departments and is now dean of the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. and andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. what were the main schools of thought. how did the camps break down in this argument inside the administration on what to do about syria, andrew? >> basically you have a discussion about syria about all the different options. and it really comes down to this. the white house was hedgingment they really did not want to get involved in syria. they have a firm policy to stay out of the middle east and would like to pull back. at the same time the agencies that deal with syria and the problem there, which is growing and mushrooming, the state department, cia and to a certain extent the department o
. >> there are an estimated 19,000 sexual assaults in the military each year. yet, according to pentagon officials, only a fraction of those incidents are reported. congress last investigated this issue almost a decade ago until now. new york senator kirsten gillibrand chairs the subcommittee on personnel and has just announced a hearing on march 13th where she will hear from victims of this growing epidemic for the first time. she joins me now. senator, thank you very much. tell me what you want to know about this epidemic really. continuing epidemic, mostly men on women. >> yeah. andrea, as you said, their estimated 19,000 sexual assaults a year in the military, but only a fraction are reported. about 2,400 were record last year, and of those only about 240 went to trial. >> away we really need is accountability and much more transparency. we need it to be a safe place for men and women to serve, and we need to show that we can protect the men and women that are searching in the military, so this hearing is going to shine a light on what the problem is, what are the solutions, and what needs to be don
is in october. so it's a lot of money in a short amount of time, and it will affect pentagon workers, and they've made a point, they're going to have to be furloughed a day a week beginning inapril. you are going to probably have individual stories of hurt and pain, the family that saved up for a vacation and shows up at a national park, two kids in the backseat, and it's closed. that's what happened during the government shutdown. it's stories like that that can go viral. you are going to have kids turned away from headstart because they can't afford to cover that many people. but it's not all going to be felt in one day. and frankly, people are so cynical about government and government spending that most people think, you know, either the politicians are going to solve this at the last minute, or it is not going to matter anyway. so you haven't -- the president has tried to gin up an emotional reaction in the country among his supporters, and i don't think that's really happened. >> to add to that, only 44 billion of the 85 billion in cuts will go into effect in 2013, amounting to about 0.6
. >> pentagon spokesman george little talked about how sequestration would affect the defense budget. glmpleght first, as you know, the sequestration goes in to effect for the remain of the year. it will require that the department of defense to cut roughly $46 billion from the level of funding provided on the 2013 continuing resolution. all of the last seven months of the fiscal year. by law, sequester would apply to all of the dod budget. including wartime spending. the only exception is that the president has indicated his intend to -- personnel funding from sequestration. dod leaders support the decision, it does not mean that other budget accounts will be cut by larger amounts to offset the exemption. accounted by account item by item. cuts to the operating portion of the dod budget must be equal in percentage at the let of appropriations accounts. for example, army active operation maintenance, navy reserve operation and maintenance, and air force guard. for the investment the dollars cut must be allocated. that means more than 2500 programs or projects that separately identified need to
to go into effect. they would give the pentagon more wiggle room to do something about it to shift money and around invite the white house's own ideas. that will be defeated as well as a democratic plan. the budgetary office found this would increase by a small amount over ten years. everybody is gonna leave town. i don't think congress will be in session tomorrow, on friday, the day these cuts go into effect. everybody will be pointing the finger. already we're talking more about what's going to happen next. for example, the house republicans next weekend may move a bill that basically keeples the automatic cuts in place and -- keeps the automatic cuts in place and gives the pentagon more leeway to shift around money and then moves forward at that lower level of funding for what's called the discretionary budget, tori. >> the president will be meeting with the republican congressional leaders tomorrow for the first time on this topic. why the wait? why wait until after the deadline? why didn't they meet before? >> it's it's sort of a logical question. when the meeting with the congressi
. as is widely recognized, sequestration over the next 10 years apply to the pentagon budget would only reduce it in inflation adjusted terms to what it was in 2007 a. the most powerful military in the world -- 2007, as the most powerful military in the world engaged in a war in iraq and the challenge in afghanistan. if members of congress pay attention to the facts, they will see a clear path to dramatically reduce pentagon spending without undermining america's position as being the most powerful nation on the planet. and nobody has done a better job of highlighting a path forward, an area of opportunity, than walter pinkus writhing on the pages of the "washington post" over the last couple years as he details the sweep of our nuclear weapons program and the spending trajectory. this morning's latest offering should be required reading for every member of congress and the ones who whine the loutest should be forced to read it -- loudest should be forced to read it twice. he details a vast array of nuclear weapons already deployed, ready to be deployed within 30 minutes, a relic of our conten
. the abuse and waste and the fraud is astoppedding. i think the pentagon needs to be paired down. we need the pentagon to look at their own priorities." we are pressed for time so i would, if i could, have the joint chiefs go down the line, quickly, if you can answer with yes or no, whether you agree with the general characterization that the senator made. that'd be great. [laughter] >> let me try it. it's a good question. it's a fair question. i don't -- i can't speak for senator hagel, but my interpretation of that is that it is along the lines of something that secretary gates used to say which was that we had accumulated over the decade post-9/11 when our budget was just kept going up over year, and i said this in lo gist ticks. when the budget goes up year in and year out, it's fair to say that when you had a management problem, all of our managers, they -- it was easy to reach for more money to solve your managing problem, whether it's a technical program or problem or something like that. it was noticeable as secretary in logistics that in some places that having had accumulated ov
no auditable books in the pentagon. panetta, that's the one agency of government that has never submitted an audited set of books in history. >> bill: wow. >> not one -- and frankly by itself, that would i think provide an ability to really see where we're throwing money away. and again, secretary panetta, to his credit, has got a mandate within the four branches to basically say 2014, we've got to do this. frankly, it is going to be interesting to see if they can hit this goal. the size of the pentagon is bigger than 90 countries gdp. so but again so yes there's definitely smart savings that you can do there. again, i would go back to the afghanistan expenditure $2 billion a week we're spending over there. no one thinks we're going to have a combat mission after 2014. so you know, that's money that we're not going to be spending. and so really, the opportunities are there to avoid again by the way, the bipartisan policy center, "new york times" yesterday, said a million jobs will be lost if sequestration goes through. cbo says 1.4. >> bill: congressman, a lot of battles to fight. we're g
is "usa today's" pentagon reporter. he wrote the article. welcome. >> good morning, carol. >> thanks so much for enlightening us on this issue. this program sends americans to iraq and afghanistan to win hearts and minds. tell us about sexual harassment, racism. outline these problems for us. >> these come in an army investigative report that we were -- we obtained through a freedom of information act request. the harassment seemed pretty gross. it was a contractor at the training base making really untoward comments toward the women. eventually, he was fired. that was documented. as well as racism. there was a white soldier who was referring to a section of the program and saying it was a ghetto because it had black people in it. that soldier was disciplined. >> yet some of the members of this group, with all the problems, were making more money than the secretary of defense? >> that's the most disturbing problem. it regards time sheet padding, and it was encouraged, apparently, according to the documents we found. these people were saying they routinely worked 84-hour weeks, billing f
. these are decisions that have to be calculated at the pentagon, and the political cost has to be evaluated in the white house. if you're going to do what you have to do fully and effectively. and if you can't have, yeah, can't have an operation. so if you're going to go that route you have to be fully committed to its success. >> please join me in thanking david phillips for a wonderful presentation, a preview of a great book. showing the relevance of your work and your ideas. thank you much. >> thank you, michael. [applause] >> and thank you all for being with us today. >> we are learning today the president obama has accepted the retirement of the longest serving leader of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan, marine general john allen. he was the president's nominee to be supreme allied commander in europe. that nomination was on hold during a pentagon investigation into e-mails that general our exchange with a civilian woman who was linked to the scandal that forced general david petraeus to resign. general allen has since been cleared of wrongdoing. the "washington post" reporting that
of the c-span video library at c-span.org. live now to the pentagon for a briefing on civilian layoffs related to the pending sequester cuts happening next week. >> we have notified congress today about potential furlough. today with us we have our undersecretary, mr. robert hale and acting undersecretary jessica wright. here to address questions they do have some comments they would like to start with with respect to sequestration and the actual action that we took today with congress on furlough. then they will be available to take your questions. i will help them in getting your questions address. >> okay. well, good afternoon. today the department faces some the enormous budgetary uncertainty really imperiled in my experience. possibility of sequestration starting on march 1st. by the end of march could mean a 46 billion-dollar reduction in our total topline 9% in all of our accounts except military personnel including wartime accounts. we will protect the wartime operating accounts, but that means larger, disproportionate cuts in the base budget operation and maintenance accounts.
good-bye for leon panetta. the pentagon sends the boss off with a formal ceremony happening today, even though he is likely to be on the job for at least another couple of weeks. panetta spoke yesterday before congress, said there will always an debate over how much military power to put around the world. >> united states military, as i've said, is not and frankly should not be a 911 service capable of arriving on the scene within minutes to every possible contingency around the world. u.s. military has neither the resources nor the responsibility to have a firehouse next to every u.s. facility in the world. >> former senator chuck hagel has been nominated to replace panetta. that confirmation vote continues and has been postponed. >>> a look at this massive crowd that filled the streets in tunisia. this was a public funeral of an opposition leader shot dead outside his home wednesday. thousands of grieving and angry folks marching with his coffin to a cemetery. many believe it was a political assassination. riot police have violently put down several public demonstrations since that sh
and democrats face a march 1 deadline to avoid billions in across-the-board spending cuts. the pentagon announced it will offer benefits to same-sex couples. in the senate is wrapping up work on the violence against women act. and the house will vote on a bill requiring the president to offer a plan to balance the federal budget in 10 years. good morning. we begin with your take on the leaked white paper from the white house just fine drone strikes on u.s. citizens overseas. nbc news reported on the memo monday night and it has gotten lots of reaction in washington. what are your thoughts? call -- we want to get your thoughts on social media as well on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get your thoughts in a moment. first, josh gerstein is joining us on the phone. here's your headline -- what was this memo? guest: this is a white paper that looks like it was derived from some confidential legal opinions that the opinions -- opinions that the justice department wrote that authorized drones or some other counter-terrorism operations to basically killed u.s. citizens overs
, fraud and abuse going on at the pentagon. i can't for the life of me figure out how we can budget when the single largest discretionary item on our budget cannot be audited. we need them to have an audit to know where our tax dollars are going and set priorities. let me ask you about the c.b.o. report on the american recovery and investment act. i would like to ask you, mr. director, can you explain how our government's targeted investment and the american people and in our nation's critical infrastructure, how that created jobs and how it helped to begin to grow the economy. and also if we invested in a program that provided coordinated benefits and social services that listed the long-term economic stability and incomes, say half the families living in poverty, what impact would that have overall in terms of our economic growth? >> as you know, we have estimated consistently for the past four years that the recovery act taking effect at the time it did with the economic circumstances that the country faced, increased output and jobs relative to what would have happened in the absence
's now responsible for sustainability. these reports are just coming from an office. deep in the pentagon or department of homeland security. these are deputy secretaries or assistant secretary at minimum level. as a result you get senior interested in these. the interesting day is the first set of these is a lot of exploring a better understanding of challenges within the big enterprise we have an beginning to put together strategies in the path we are headed. we are beginning to make great progress towards these goals. we're implementing strategy and dining areas that need to be addressed. the sustainability plans today look a little bit different than three years ago. if you're interested in finding them, there are performance stack of available for the public. >> is what way do they look different? >> they now are -- were not implementing strategies. if you look back, and they may have been trying things early on and now you're finding what works were also fighting we can take the strategies themselves and look at the department of transportation is doing really well in greenhouse gas
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)